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Interviews


I like talking about myself and my own art, but I like talking to other artists just as much. So when I started this blog at the beginning of 2010, I thought it would be fun to post interviews with artists I meet at exhibition previews, or on visits to their studios. I also interviewed people with other connections to the arts, such as writers, and an owner of an independent bookstore. Most of these interviews were conducted via email: I sent five or six questions, the artists emailed their replies to me. They all have interesting things to say about their process, and their own particular field of artistic expertise. I hope you have as much fun reading through these as I had putting them together.

Juanli Carrion: mixed media.
Darryll Schiff: photographer.
Kevin Swallow: painter.
Seth Friedman: sculptor.
Nancy Charak: painter.
Wili Bambach: painter/sculptor.
Stella Untalan: mixed media.
Donna Hapac: sculptor.
Lynn Tsan: digital artist.
Rick Beerhorst: painter.
Connie Noyes: mixed media.
Judith Mullen: mixed media.
Andrew Crane: painter.
Tim McFarlane: painter.
Luis Roca: photographer.
George Raica: painter.
Thomas Bennett: painter.
Shu-Ju Wang: painter.
Hazel Ang: illustrator.
Dan Schreck: painter.
Lisa Beck: objects-sculpture-installation.
Lynn Shapiro: artist-writer
Dianne Bowen: artist-writer.
Linda Peer: artist-writer.

dm simons: artist-writer.
Helen Ferguson Crawford: artist-writer
Tullio DeSantis: artist-writer.
Deborah Doering: conceptual art, gallery director.

Bobby Biedrezycki: writer.
Carrie Ohm: ceramics, performance.
Lisa Purdy: painter.
Judith Sutcliffe: artist, writer, director of Shake Rag Alley art center.
Julia Katz: painter.
Diane Huff: monoprints.
Allison Svoboda: collaged ink drawings.
John Hubbard: painter.
Janet Chenoweth & Roger Halligan: painter; sculptor.
Tom Robinson: Chicago art legend.
Kay Hartmann: graphic novel.
Chuck Gniech: painter.
Suzy Takacs: independent bookstore owner.
Rebecca Moy: painter.
Philip Hartigan: mixed media.
Ann Mazzanovich: jewelry maker.

Martha Weintraub: digital photoartist.
Bruce Sheridan: film-maker.
Kirsty Hall: obsessive projects artist.
Lauren Targ: multi-media artist & writer.
Konstantin Ray: painter & gallery director.
Phillip Buntin: painter.
Katey Schultz: writer.
Patricia Ann McNair: writer.
Carol Setterlund: painter/sculptor.
Rebecca Keller: installation.
Herve Constant: painting/video.
Dragica Carlin: painter.
Mark Castator: sculptor.
Paul Baines: graphic artist.
Mai Leijonstedt: book artist.
Kurt Ankeny: painter.
Ian Talbot: photographer.
Donna Marsh: painter.
John Murphy: mixed media.
Kari Cholnoky: mixed media.
Abigail Markov: painter.
Lena Levin: painter.
Jina Wallwork: painter.
Julia Schwartz: painter.
Kate Wilson: mixed media.

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